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News | January 20, 2015

Native Plant Society Meeting for February

NPSoT-logoThe February meeting of the local chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas will feature the program ‘Texas Wildscapes’, presented by Kelly Conrad Simon. She has been with Texas Parks and Wildlife for 19 years and currently serves as the Urban Wildlife Biologist for the Central Texas area.

The program emphasizes using native plants in landscaped beds to provide critical components of habitat: food and shelter. By providing the elements of habitat (food, shelter, and water) in their gardens, Texans can attract an exciting variety of birds, butterflies, frogs, and lizards and bring the beauty and vitality of nature home.

This meeting will be held Tuesday, February 17 at 7:00 pm at the GVTC Auditorium located at 36101 FM 3159, Canyon Lake. For more information visit the Lindheimer NPSoT website.

Plant of the Month: Anacacho Orchid Tree

Anacacho Orchid Tree

The Anacacho Orchid Tree is a small tree or multi-trunked shrub, 6′ to 12′ tall. Although uncommon in the wild, it can generally be found at nurseries that carry native plants. Its common name stems from the area where it is found growing naturally: the Anacacho Mountains of the western Edwards Plateau, where it is found growing in canyons and arroyos, primarily in Kinney County and a few other spots in Texas and northeast Mexico.
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News | January 8, 2015

Native Plant Society of Texas Meeting

NPSoT-logoThe Lindheimer Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas (NPSoT) will meet on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 at 7:00 pm. The meeting will be held at the GVTC Auditorium located at 36101 FM 3159, Canyon Lake.

The program ‘The Role of Native Plants in our Lives’ with Lonnie Childs will be an amusing presentation packed with awesome photos of flora and fauna, presented by the Lindheimer NPSoT.

For more information visit the Lindheimer NPSoT website, contact Janet Wilson (wiljan39@gmail.com), or our president, Sharon Thomas, at scthomas@gvtc.com. The regular meeting date for the rest of the year is the 3rd Tuesday of each month.

News | November 10, 2014

NPSOT at South Texas Growers

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Members of NPSOT identify Texas native plants at South Texas Growers.

News | October 10, 2014

Learn More About Texas Natives With N.I.C.E.

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N.I.C.E. stands for ‘Natives Instead of Common Exotics’. NICE volunteers will be at South Texas Growers this Saturday the 11th from 10am to 12pm.

A recent story on NPR explained native plants in an interview with Mary Moses from Comal County’s Native Plant Society of Texas.

As Texas slowly begins its cool-down, many people turn their thoughts toward landscaping in the fall and winter. Landscaping is tough work, but there are things you can do to make it easier, and also cheaper. How? Well, you need to go native.

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News | October 9, 2014

Fall Plant Sale

stg-flowers

Our fall plant sale is running now through November 15, 2014.

All of our 1 gal. salvias are only $5, 5 gal. salvias are $12.50, and 1 gal. lantanas are $3. All other plants & trees are 15% off.

Come browse our nursery at 22201 Hwy 46W in Bulverde, TX, just 2 miles west of US281.

News, Plant of the Month | September 2, 2014

Plant of the Month: Texas Sotol

texassotol

Texas Sotol is an attractive desert perennial often mistaken for a yucca. It has a long, dark bluish-green blade-like leaves with sharp, toothed edges. Its basal leaves grow 3′ – 4′ tall. In early summer it sends up a 9′-15′ flower stalk, bearing a 2′-3′ spike of yellowish flowers at the end. Sotol occurs in Central and West Texas in various habitats from prairies and plains to flat desert areas. It needs full sun, good drainage and is very drought tolerant.

The dried flower stalks have been used as a renewable building material for temporary corrals, etc., and the leaves have been used for thatching and also to make baskets. Native Americans and early Texas settlers used Sotol as a food source. The bulb like root was cooked, sun dried and then ground into a flour, which, when mixed with water, was formed into little cakes that were baked. In times of drought the heart of the plant splits open, exposing the soft interior, providing food for deer and javalenas.

Sotol is a good xeriscape plant for rock gardens. It combines naturally with rocks, curly mesquite grass, and low-growing drought-tolerant plants such as damianita and blackfoot daisy. Linheimer muhly is a nice contrast when planted nearby. Give it plenty of room to show at its best. Sotol makes a great barrier plant and is a good substitute for Pampas grass. It can be grown in large containers. Removed old flower stalks at the base. It is highly deer resistant.

Note: Crossvine is a NPSOT NICE! selection for Summer 2014.

Text by John Siemssen. Photos by Joseph A. Marcus, Wildflower Center

News | March 20, 2014

Third Annual ‘Spring Has Sprung’ Event

Our third annual ‘Spring Has Sprung’ plant sale and garden event will be held Saturday, April 12th from 9AM to 3PM here at our nursery.

Come learn about the Bulverde Community Park and the new Bulverde Community Garden, as well as the N.I.C.E. program.

Barbecue fajitas and sodas will be for sale from 11AM to 2PM.

We will be offering 15% off on all plants and trees. Learn about worm composting. Bring pet food for the Bulverde Humane Society and get a free plant!

News | March 5, 2014

The Girls Scouts at South Texas Growers

girl scouts

Girl Scout troops 96 & 362 earned their gardening badges recently at South Texas Growers.

Plant of the Month | February 26, 2014

Plant of the Month: Crossvine

crossvine

Crossvine (bignonia capreolata) is a plant for a large space. It will grow to 50’ or more, climbing by means of tendrils. These have small “claws” at the end which allow the vine to cling to stone or brick without any additional support. Its main attraction is the trumpet shaped flowers which appear in the spring and can completely cover the vine. These can be red with a yellow throat, yellow with a red throat or combinations of these colors. The vines are evergreen through most of Texas. The dark green leaves take on a purplish tinge in winter.

Crossvine is native from East Texas to Florida. In its natural locations it grows at the edge of moist woodlands, but it adapts to other situations as well. It will succeed in Blackland Prairie clay or limestone soils, although in the latter case it may take a few years for it to become fully established and vigorous. It will bloom best if planted in full sun, although it can tolerate part shade. In full sun, Crossvine benefits from some extra water and organic soil enrichment.

The trumpet shaped flowers are attractive to hummingbirds, and the vine tends to bloom during the spring migration period. Deer will browse the leaves, so it needs protection until it has grown tall enough to be out of reach.

Note: Crossvine is a NPSOT NICE! selection for Spring 2014.

Text by John Siemssen. Photos by Joseph A. Marcus, Wildflower Center